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Monday Thoughts 6/29/2020

“The beginning is always today.”  -Mary Shelley

“The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for your senses to grow sharper.”  -W.B. Yeats

“The beginning is the most important part of the work.”  -Plato

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 #1 I have a life-threatening problem that once had me.

I now take charge of my life and my well-being. 

I accept the responsibility.
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 Welcome to your New Life!  Today is a brand-new day, filled with endless possibilities and it does not matter if you are 20 years sober or less than 24 hours sober, your New Life starts right now.  This day can be anything you want it to be; you are taking charge of your life and well-being. You are accepting the responsibility.

Today, embrace this beginning.  It states in our WFS Program booklet “New Life begins with recognizing that we have a life-threatening problem and accepting the responsibility to be in charge of our own lives.  By acknowledging our reliance on alcohol or drugs, we can begin to explore why we sought to escape.”  In balanced and long-term recovery, escape is not an option, but responding with our ability is.

No matter where you are on your journey, begin today.  If today is your first day sober, connect with the women on the WFS Online Forum.  Write your first post and introduce yourself.  A simple hello is enough!  If you are cemented in sobriety, how about reaching out to someone who has just said hello. During a Zoom meeting this week, share how you moved through your first month sober.  What did you do?  What didn’t you do?  How did your body feel?  Name some feelings and share your most often used recovery tool.  As our Motto says, we are bonded together!

Hugzzz

Karen

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Hi 4C Women,

With the pandemic and alcohol sales skyrocketing, I am grateful for Statement #1.  This Statement helped me tremendously, especially in the beginning when I felt so intimidated to be in charge of my life.  For so long, I had been made to feel incompetent, inadequate and unable to make the right decisions.  I was honestly quite scared to be in charge of my life, however, I persevered and I survived my mistakes as WFS taught me to view these as life lessons.  I’ve had a LOT of life lessons yet knew and know I would never again give up accepting responsibility for my life and well-being.  It’s a pretty empowering place to be.

Last year our group did a Relapse Prevention Plan while acknowledging that there may be slips and relapses during the recovery process (process is the key word). 

Here’s a sample list of things that may cause slips and relapses:

           Stress

·         Dealing with the underlying issues in therapy

·         Becoming overwhelmed by feelings and emotions

·         Death of a family member, friend or other significant person in your life

·         Marital and family problems

·         Feelings of loneliness, shame, guilt, anger and abandonment

·         People’s reactions to changes you are making in your life

·         Fear of change and/or living without alcohol

·         Celebrations

·         Successes

·         Habits – familiarity

 

What would you add to this list?

This is where coping tools come in once you can identify what could cause a relapse or slip.  What would be a healthy way to cope with any of the above situations/feelings?  Do you have a plan A, B, C or whatever It takes to be in charge of a healthy choice?  There are costs (risks and disadvantages) and benefits (rewards and advantages) to our choices in active addiction.  I have expressed many times that we need to be honest with ourselves and the costs/benefits.  I was reluctant to do this exercise as I saw no benefit in my uncontrolled drinking.  However, my answers explained why at one time I did see the benefits (short term).  An example was drinking gave me an excuse for nothing being my fault, forgetting my problems, the feelings of rejection and being unlovable, immediately numbing pain.  When I did the costs, it became clear how short term and destructive the benefits were.  I didn’t realize how much until I wrote it down.  Long term costs became so obvious, i.e., hangovers, harming relationships, no room for personal growth, no problem-solving skills, health issues, legal issues.  So, while I was more than reluctant to do this exercise, I am glad I did.  There is something about seeing my life in words that has a greater impact on me.  I would encourage you to do this for your own well-being and benefit. 

Lastly, the final part of the exercise was to list the cost and rewards of NOT drinking or using drugs. I found the list of benefits much longer than the costs.  The list of costs was losing drinking friends, no quick fix for emotions and coping with intense feelings – all risky challenges for me at one time.  Yet, the list of benefits became obvious and long term.  They included improved health, memory of what I said or did, saving money, saving reputation, freedom from fears, building or rebuilding friends and relationships, and very important to me, being available.  The freedom of being available, whether it was to pick up my children or listen quietly and respectfully to another’s hurt and needs, was the best gift I received in my sobriety.  I treasure it to this day. 

What is your gift that you treasure in being in charge of your life and your well-being?  I hope you decide to take on the challenge of these exercises and share it with your WFS group or a trusted friend.  It is one way to start the process of understanding your personal costs and benefits.  The answers will provide coping tools in moving forward as you become more empowered in your life choices and well-being. 

Bonded in accepting the process of being in charge of our lives and well-being, Dee

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Monday Thoughts 6/22/2020

“The difficulty we have in accepting responsibility for our behavior lies in the desire to avoid the pain of the consequences of that behavior.”  ~~M. Scott Peck

“Being more aware creates responsibility.  What does responsibility mean? It means the ability to respond.  The more conscious you are in your ability to respond, the more creative you’ll be.”  ~~Deepak Chopra

“In the long run, we shape our lives, and we shape ourselves.  The process never ends until we die.  And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility.”  ~~Eleanor Roosevelt

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#13 I am responsible for myself and for my actions.

I am in charge of my mind, my thoughts and my life.

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 Many of us are still riding the wonderful wave of energy from our Envision It 2020 Virtual Conference.  This event was a remarkable success made possible through the responsibility of 4C women across the world, and as a nonprofit business.  This yearly event could have been cancelled like so many other events, yet WFS understood the need and value and asked for your help in making this event possible.  You responded with your abilities, whether it be time, talent and/or finances to make this event unfold.  It is a beautiful testament of the WFS Statements in action.  (Please note that replay of our Envision It 2020 Conference has been extended to June 28th! For those who registered.)

Statement #13, part of Level Six of the New Life Program, states in our WFS Program booklet, “The purpose of the New Life Program is self-acceptance and being responsible for ourselves and all that we do. By accepting responsibility, we can break away from unhealthy dependencies.”  In my own life, releasing blame laid a clear path into responsibility and freedom.  It took some time to understand that I was in fact, blaming others even when not stating so.  It was the awareness and observations of my responses to people or events in life that revealed my efforts to blame others.

Growing into responsibility is a life-long process; we continue to evolve on our journey of sobriety and recovery.  Supporting each other as we move through challenges and difficulties allows us to connect, love and respond in ever increasing ability and awareness.  How do you respond with your ability today?  How is this different from before your New Life?

Hugzzz

Karen
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Hi 4C Women,

I’ve said this over the years that I was the Queen of Blame.  I wore my crown proudly because nothing was ever my responsibility.  This is not to say that the actions and words of others did not wound me.  However, placing blame for my entire adult life on others, left me stuck and not providing room for emotional/personal growth.  There was a lot of pain growing up yet as I pulled the layers of pain away, I realized there were loving times as well.  In order to be the Queen of Blame, I didn’t allow the love to come into the picture, the “all or nothing” thinking.  That was my light bulb moment.  If I could focus on the love as much as I did the pain, perhaps I could finally learn to take responsibility for my life in the present, my well-being, responses rather than reactions and most importantly, speaking my voice, setting boundaries.  I recently read that if people respond angrily to your boundaries, it usually means they needed to be set.   As a child, I did not have power.  As an adult, I most certainly do.  Of course, that meant change!  I was resistant to change – again because that meant I would have to take responsibility for my well-being.  Anger and resentment were how I justified my blaming others long after the hurt happened.  I knew that in order to take responsibility, I had to accept a commitment to personal growth.  Once I made that decision, I found that I was eager to change, to be in charge of my life.  I even surprised myself!

I used a handout in one of my f2f meetings.  It described change in 3 behavioral styles: Victim, Survivor, Navigator.  I chose Navigator because it was similar to the WFS philosophy.

A Navigator:

Uses positive “self-talk

Establishes clear goals

Molds their sense of self-identity

Is proactive and works thought-out plans

Takes care of themselves

Acknowledges their fears – naming your fears rather than surrendering to vague dread, you can clarify the challenges and refute the unrealistic inaccurate fears

Navigator self-talk includes:

Reframing the situation (looking for a more positive view of situation)

Refuting self-limited statements (seek positive, accurate messages)

Avoiding “all or nothing” thinking

Praising self

Preparing for future events

This led me to questions from Karen in a previous message
Are you comfortable being in charge of your life?  Why?  Wny not?
Share an experience in which you used this Statement and were content with the results.
What does responsibility feel like in your New Life?

Bonded In being responsible for ourselves and our actions, Dee

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Monday Thoughts 6/15/2020

“If you want to go fast, go alone.  If you want to go far, go together.”  ~~African Proverb

“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” ~~Helen Keller

“Find a group of people who challenge and inspire you, spend a lot of time with them, and it will change your life.”  ~~Amy Poehler

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#12 I am a competent woman, and I have much to give life.

This is what I am, and I shall know it always.

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WE DID IT!  The 2020 WFS Annual Conference may officially be over, but the connection and love remains.  From shore to shore, women across the world came together in the only way that we could this year: virtually.  Imagine, in about 10 weeks’ time, YOU dear competent women, put your strengths together and assembled the first ever WFS Virtual Conference.  What a shining example of Statement #12 in action!

Doubt and uncertainty did not have a chance this weekend as 4C women everywhere came together to bring this event to life  What we were able to experience the past 3 days was the culmination of determination, passion and of course, love!  From our Opening Ceremony on Friday night, the exceptional breakout sessions, and keynote speakers to our Closing ceremony on Sunday afternoon, every Statement was in full action this weekend.  We experienced laughter, we experienced enthusiasm and we experienced connection and love!

Aside from a few minor technical hiccups, Envision It 2020 was a smashing success!  A record number of women signed up this year and while we are still working on gathering all the final numbers, our total amount raised has reached $95K!! WOWWOWWOWWOW!!!! The open-house sessions last week helped us learn how to use the software beforehand, and there were activities all weekend long to keep us connected while we eagerly awaited each session.  Women connected in our virtual dorm area, while you shared your thoughts for the future vision of WFS on our virtual vision board.  You donated your time, your talent and shared in making this weekend exceedingly beautiful. Remember, the recordings will be available the rest of this week!

We are capable, competent, caring, and compassionate!  WE ARE 4C!

If you were able to attend this year, what was your greatest takeaway?  If you were not able to attend, it is a great time to start planning for next year!

Hugzzz

Karen

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Hi 4C Women,

My greatest takeaway was the reinforcement of why I value and treasure the WFS Program.  I became sober in 1988 and what drew me to the program and continues to keep me sober and wanting to share this with women everywhere are several things:

· Building self-esteem – I am a competent woman. I am empowered.   I had a problem that once had me.  I am no longer stuck in the past feeling guilt and shame over my past mistakes and choices.  I have learned from them and built a phenomenal toolbox of coping skills.   My goal, through WFS, has always been to heal and part of that is letting go of labels and forgiving myself.  I do not deny that my past has made me who I was, yet I have worked hard on healing and forgiving myself for what I cannot change.   I continue to move forward in the process of healing.  As Jean said, this is not a competition.  We have diverse backgrounds and what matters is that our substance use created a problem in our lives and a big part of the process for me was in learning to love myself, to develop healthy relationships beginning with myself and extending to others.

· If any woman relapses, WFS is a safe place to share.  There will be encouragement and support.  Hopefully, there will be a learning process for each individual to understand what happened and to gain new coping tools.   I also appreciate greatly that while we do not count days in WFS, we honor and celebrate the positive emotional and personal growth changes women make on their recovery journey.  Our philosophy is that no matter how long you have been sober and if you relapse, there is much you have learned about yourself.    You are not the same person and that is important to remember.  You are not starting over but continuing on your personal path.   We are happy to celebrate milestones if a woman chooses to do so. What I have done is ask the woman what positive changes she has made during this time.  It is the inside changes, the new coping tools and healing that makes the difference in building self-esteem and personal growth.

· Our guidelines are all about showing compassion, respect and sharing of our personal experiences that may help a woman seeking input.

This is all about learning to be responsible for our own decisions, actions, and healing yet we are not alone.  We are bonded together in overcoming our addictions.  TOGETHER is the key word!  Am I fired up after this virtual conference?  You bet I am!  It was amazing and the incredible women who put all this together are beyond description.

Competent women bonded together in overcoming our addictions, Dee

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New WFS Meeting – Sharon Hill, PA (Sunday)

WFS is proud to announce the start of a new face-to-face meeting!

Sharon Hill, PA

Sundays at 7:00 PM

Please email 1121@womenforsobriety.org with questions and to obtain the exact location of the meeting.

Please join us in extending our gratitude to the volunteer Certified Moderator who has made the commitment to bring the New Life Program to her local community!

If you are feeling inspired to bring WFS to your local community, please review the requirements for becoming a Certified Moderator and contact the Face-to-Face Management Team for assistance.

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Monday Thoughts 6/8/2020

enthusiastic women

“You are your best thing.”  ~~Toni Morrison

“I still get wildly enthusiastic about little things….I play with leaves, I skip down the street and run against the wind.”  ~~Leo Buscaglia

“Determine to live life with flair and laughter.”  ~~Maya Angelou
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#11 Enthusiasm is my daily exercise.

I treasure the moments of my New Life.
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It is just days away!  “Envision It 2020”, our Women for Sobriety Virtual Conference will start on Friday, June 12th and is filled with connection, WFS meetings and informative and exciting workshops. This weekend is the culmination of countless hours of volunteer effort, adaptation and what Statement #11 is filled with, enthusiasm!

Just like many other plans that needed to be altered this year, WFS adapted the format and virtual conference planning began.  Our keynote speakers this year are Dawn Nickel, Ph.D., founder of She Recovers and Lynn Matti, MA, author, coach, and Cognitive Behavioral Licensed Mental Wellness Counselor.  Starting with our Opening Ceremony on Friday evening, the weekend is brimming with enthusiasm.  Join in the fun with interactive sessions, themed video lounges and discussion boards.  This year WFS offers 4 live workshops opportunities and 17 breakout sessions which include “Intuitive Eating in Recovery,” and “Five Money Questions for Women.”

Set your enthusiasm soaring this weekend.  If you have not signed up yet, there is still time.  Jump start your practice of Statement #11 this week and join us for WFS Envision It 2020 Virtual Conference, click here to register.

Hugzzz

Karen
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Hi 4C Women,

I love how the WFS organization and the incredible 4C women have accepted this unprecedented challenge of a virtual conference.  It has taken the commitment of many women willing to volunteer hundreds of hours to get this together.  I have to admit that along with my enthusiasm is acknowledging that I am a bit out of my comfort zone but that is okay.  It is one of the many reasons I value the WFS program.  I can admit my concerns and focus on what I will learn from this experience.  One thing I can share is that I did not volunteer to be part of the IT team and for very obvious reasons!

I do hope you will consider registering for the conference.  There is so much we can learn from the workshops and presenters.  I believe this conference will be such a powerful benefit in giving us both the enthusiasm we are seeking and bonding together in coping with this recent time of social isolation.  What’s great is that we can view all the workshops and presentations for a whole week after the conference.  We won’t have to miss a single thing!

In thinking about enthusiasm and treasuring the moments of your New Life, what interests have come into your life in recovery?  Are they new interests or renewed ones?  What treasures have you discovered as you embark on discovering and uncovering your joy, your enthusiasm in your New Life?

It might help to answer these questions if you are struggling to find enthusiasm:

What puts a smile on your face?

What sparks your creativity?

What would you do for free?

Bonded in seeking and experiencing enthusiasm in our New Life, Dee


WFS Virtual Weekend Conference
June 12-14, 2020

Last Chance to Register!

Don’t miss your chance to connect with hundreds of 4C women from around the world at the immersive online experience!

Still on the fence about the tech?

Check out these FREE opportunities to try Zoom before the event.

NEW! WFS Online Video Meetings!

  • Tuesdays Together with MACC
    Every Tuesday at 9:30 pm US/Eastern (6:30 pm US/Pacific)
  • Midweek Refresh with Susieh
    Every Wednesday at 2:00 pm US/Eastern (11:00 am US/Pacific)
  • Thursday Connections with mistyeyed
    Every Thursday at 5:00 pm US/Eastern (2:00 pm US/Pacific)
  • Great Start Girlfriends morning check-in (30 min only)
    Daily – see WFS Online Chat Schedule for full details
Conference Open Houses – OPEN TO EVERYONE
  • Tuesday, June 9th, 9:30-11:30 am US/Eastern – CLICK HERE
  • Thursday, June 10th, 6-8 pm US/Eastern – CLICK HERE

 

The conference website has already launched and the icebreakers have begun – sign up today for instant access!

Self-selection Sliding Scale: $25-$75, Scholarships also available
Attend 8 live sessions, review the other 13 later! Read our FAQs here.
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How Intersectional is Your Feminism?

Feminism & Women For Sobriety
by Jean Kirkpatrick, PhD

In the early years, I was always startled when persons referred to WFS as part of the feminist movement and yet, I see quite clearly that it is.  Although I always knew that the values sought for through the Program are for women to be free from domination from others and to find themselves, I just never spoke of the WFS Program in this way.

But what is feminism?  Has there ever been a movement or a word so badly treated and misunderstood?

To me, feminism is the right of women to seek equality in jobs, in payment for those jobs, and to be treated equally under the law.  But it is so much more then that too.

To me, it means that we are to seek an equal status for ourselves and, in order to do that, we must find ourselves, define ourselves, and believe in ourselves.  And that’s what our program seeks to do.

Too long we have been treated unfairly through the overriding dominance of the male system, yet there was none other.  Too often I think we wanted to rebel but didn’t put anything in the place of the rebellion.

We cannot rise up against something unless we have something better to offer and I believe that can only happen when we change ourselves from dependent persons to independent persons, women strong in our beliefs, convictions, and commitments.

It is too easy to cry out about inequality without any substance underneath.  The WFS Program should provide a way to make us strong in beliefs that provide substance to our outcry.  Improving ourselves ultimately improves society.

One therapist, Miriam Greenspan, believes our thinking is at fault.  Women fail to recognize the ways that men depend upon women and we end up thinking of ourselves as ‘dependent,’ when, in reality, it is men who are dependent.  Women have been misled in our thinking.  Society continues to accommodate male independence and thwart women’s, and so we, as women, have impaired thinking.

Women for Sobriety stands for women’s strengths.  Both the program and the organization are dedicated to women finding inner strengths to create, and live the kind of lives we desire to live.

 

In the late 1980’s, WFS program founder Dr. Jean Kirkpatrick wrote the above article for the Sobering Thoughts newsletter. She also wrote frequently about women’s rights and the gender pay gap, and openly lamented about the Equal Rights Amendment not being ratified. Additionally, Jean testified twice before senate sub-committees advocating regarding the gender-specific needs of women with substance use disorders. Indeed, Jean was not afraid of “getting political” when it mattered – when it was relevant to the cause of empowering women so that they could come into their own and take control of their lives and their addictions.

As feminist theory has evolved, it has broadened to recognize the concept of intersectionality. This is the idea that in addition to the challenges faced by all women in our culture by virtue of their gender, some women face additional systemic and social barriers that compound marginalization and pushes them further to the fringes. These systemic and social barriers can range from the more invisible challenges such as education level, class, socioeconomic status, and sexuality, to more visible differences such as physical disability and non-white skin tone.

It’s not an “I-have-it-worse-than-you” competition. It’s about acknowledging and recognizing imbalances so that we can correct them.

It has taken me a long time to de-stigmatize my own feelings about having prejudices toward people with different skin tones. I was raised to believe that only bad or evil people are “racist”, and I initially felt really defensive when I started to look at my own subconscious prejudices. “But I’m a good person!” was my underlying thought. It took me a long time and a lot of work to accept that my deeply ingrained biases didn’t make me a bad person — they are simply an inevitable result of growing up in a society that was built on a racialized system. We have come a long way, yes, but there is still a very long way to go.

It’s a lot like recovery. I had to come out of denial so that I could grow.

I recognize my privilege as a white woman. Even though I have experienced a number of other sources of marginalization, my skin color is not one of them. I recognize that I sometimes jump too quickly to sharing my own, unrelated challenges when my friends of color share their stories of racial discrimination. I recognize that I am quick to say that I advocate against racism while in actuality I take very little concrete action to change the system that perpetuates it. I recognize that even though this topic is important to me and highly relevant to WFS (our program surveys show that a disproportionate number of our participants – over 90% – are white), my own insecurities and privilege kept me from addressing this critical topic sooner.

This is also a lot like recovery. It’s not a single event to unlearn a lifetime of conditioning, it is an ongoing process.

Today, I am following Jean’s example and taking a risk. I am “getting political” about something that matters to me, and something that I believe should matter to every single woman that walks through the proverbial WFS door. I am scared to be “going there” in my official capacity as WFS President/CEO. I feel really vulnerable sharing these things in this public way, and as a public figure in this organization. Yet I know that my discomfort does not come close to comparing to the discomfort of my 4C Sisters of color. And I know that as a woman in a leadership position, my conscience would not be clear if I did not respond in some way to the issues that are currently being raised.

Today, I accept the responsibility of proactively learning from the resources available to me.

So here I am, asking my 4C Sisters:

  • What are we, the white women of WFS, willing to do to make sure that we fulfill the mission of WFS – to help all women find their individual path to recovery?
  • How can we effectively reach out to women of color and help them feel welcomed and included in our groups?
  • How can we hold each other accountable for creating a community that not only welcomes, but actively celebrates, every woman who finds our New Life Program?
Image Credit: https://iwda.org.au/what-does-intersectional-feminism-actually-mean/
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Monday Thoughts 6/1/2020

“The greatest thing you’ll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.” ~~Eden Ahbez
“To be fully seen by somebody, then , and be loved any how this is a human offering that can border on miraculous.” ~~Elizabeth Gilbert
“To be loved and to love, takes courage. To be fully seen is incredibly rare and breathtaking. We lower our masks and see a celestial inner being. It is our full-self—the supernova as well as the black holes.Our fears and doubts. Our anger and joy…This is love.” ~~Carolyn Riker
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#10 All love given returns.
I am learning to know that I am loved.
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Upon finding Women for Sobriety, for the first time in an exceptionally long time, I felt love without strings attached. So often in my past, love had come with a receipt. It felt as if love was something to be earned, yet my drinking and behavior eliminated that worth. In WFS, I found women who were just like me, desiring love and a New Life.

It states in the W’S Reflections for Growth spiral booklet “Just because someone else cannot love me, or even accept me, does not mean that I am without value.” The entirety of the W’S New Life Program is a demonstration of this fact. I can still recall the enthusiasm of the first woman who reached out to me on the W’S Online Forum. She sent a private message and then we spoke on the phone. I had never heard of the phrase ‘4C woman’ before; Capable, Competent, Caring and Compassionate. When she said that I was 4C, my eyes welled up. Hearing those words, her love danced through and uplifted my being.

Understanding that “love is multi-faceted” as our WFS Program booklet states, taking note of love can create a solid foundation for when love feels diminished. This sturdy base can weather us through the storms of life and seal sobriety and recovery. Love is a life-sustaining gift to be given as well as received.

How will you acknowledge, receive and share love in your New Life today?
Hugzzz
Karen
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Hi 4C Women,
This has become one of my favorite statements with the change in the action part – I am learning to know that I am loved.  For so many years, it was a huge challenge to believe and accept that others loved me for who I was.  Saturday was my 75th birthday and the love given through very caring, compassionate words, cards, text messages and calls brought home to my heart the acceptance that I am loved.  What an overwhelming honor to receive the most priceless gift of all – love!  Add to that, I adopted a 3- year old lab mix dog, Molly, 3 months ago and she has brought even more love into my life.  It’s been over 25 years since I had a pet and this was such a wonderful reminder of how unconditional a pet’s love is.

Like Karen, I thought love had to be earned and not in the best way.  Past life lessons had to be unlearned and believing I was lovable and worthwhile without giving away my value, needed to be the new lesson.  I always viewed love as only romantic love. WFS has taught me that love shows up in many diverse ways.  I am truly grateful for that lesson as my longtime previous belief kept me in the realm of feeling unworthy, unlovable or not good enough just because I didn’t have romantic love in my life.  I measured my whole self-worth on that premise.  Romantic love is beautiful yet so is the love of friends, family, animals, nature – whichever love feeds your soul.  I read a book several years ago by Dr. Gerald Jampolsky updated in 2004, Love is Letting Go of Fear.  I realized my fear was rejection.  I was living my present based on the past and building a wall so high that giving or receiving love was practically impossible.  Realizing the diversity from which love is given and received, it opened the floodgates of love once I began practicing Statement #10 and working really hard on letting go of my fear of rejection.  I use to wonder why anyone would like me, yet alone love me.   That’s when I also understood that I didn’t love myself and, again, was basing all of my fears on my own perception of being unlovable.  One of the chapters in his book is titled, “I am determined to see things differently.”  For me, that is Statement #10 in a nutshell.  I am enough, I am worthy, I am not forced to live in my past fear of rejection, I see love in all its forms through different lenses and I am learning to know that I am loved!
Bonded in giving and receiving love, Dee


WFS Virtual Weekend Conference
June 12-14, 2020

Self-selection Sliding Scale: $25-$75, Scholarships also available
Attend 8 live sessions, review the other 13 later! Read our FAQs here.

Register Now